GRAND PRIZE

Carolyn Pallett was born in Pawhuska, Oklahoma and grew up in Tulsa. Her Cherokee grandmother gave her a treadle sewing machine when she was eleven and from that time, Carolyn loved sewing clothes and making projects such as bags and beaded jewelry. Having studied with bead artist and Cherokee National Treasure Martha Berry, well known revivalist of Cherokee beadwork, studying and practicing Southeastern Woodlands Native American Beadwork is a passion.

SEQUOYAH BICENTENNIAL AWARD

Roy Boney, Jr. ᎧᏂᎦ ᎪᎳᎭ is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. He is an award-winning artist & writer whose work has been exhibited internationally. His work focuses on the intersection of Cherokee language and culture with art and technology.

BILL RABBIT LEGACY AWARD

Charlie Nichols is a woodcarver from Locust Grove, OK.

BETTY SCRAPER-GARNER ELDER AWARD

Charlie Nichols is a woodcarver from Locust Grove, OK.

JENNIE ROSS COBB PHOTOGRAPHY AWARD
Devin Dry is a Cherokee citizen and lifelong resident of Tahlequah, OK. Dry has always loved taking photos with his phone, but only recently began photography full time. Dry started his own business, DVisuals Photography, about a year ago. His information can be found on Facebook or Instagram.
EMERGING ARTIST AWARD

Joyce Lyle has been creative all of her life and is still enjoying learning new ways to develop her abilities through art. She worked 22 years for Hallmark Cards, in Kansas City, Missouri, designing and sculpting over 220 original Christmas ornaments and figurines that were sold worldwide.  Joyce retired from Hallmark in 2006 and began designing and producing her own line of Christmas ornaments to sell. She also enjoyed developing skills in mosaics, oil and water color painting and graphite drawing.

 

Joyce and her husband, Tom, moved to Tahlequah in May of 2019 and are proud registered Cherokee citizens.  She then began learning sculpting skills for bronze and is currently in a RAKU class working in water-based clay, being taught by Troy Jackson, a renowned Cherokee National Treasure.  She is working to become more involved in the Cherokee Art Community.

 

Joyce was honored to have her graphite drawing of her great aunt, Dr. Isobel Cobb, accepted to hang in the new OSU Medical School building in Tahlequah.  Dr. Cobb is said to be the first female Cherokee physician in Indian Territory, spending her life serving and helping her community.

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